Category Archives: Medical Provider Claims

WCB Fee Schedule Changes Address Out of State Medical Provider Claims

Effective April1, 2019, the Workers’ Compensation Board changed the Medical fee Schedule in effect for medical payer reimbursement in New York workers’ compensation claims. This will have a significant impact on the many Medical Provider Claims filed by New Jersey doctors and medical providers seeking reimbursement for services rendered to New York workers’ compensation claimants where the Jersey provider is demanding reimbursement at a much higher (“usual and customary”) rate than would be allowed under New York’s fee schedules.

The Changes to the Fee Schedule.

Changes to General Ground Rule 16 govern reimbursement for out-of-state treatment. The Rule now provides that a claimant who lives in New York State may treat with a qualified or Board authorized out-of-state medical provider when such treatment confirms to the Workers’ Compensation law and Regulations, the MTG’s and the Medical Fee Schedule. Payment shall be made to the medical provider as set forth herein and using the regional conversion factor for the zip code where the claimant resides.

How are fee schedule reimbursements determined?

Simple. The methodology for calculating medical reimbursement fees remains unchanged. Fee schedules are both region and activity-specific. To calculate a fee for a particular procedure:

  • Identify the appropriate conversion factor, which is listed within the respective Ground Rules document. There is a conversion factor for each geographic region and general type of medical service provided (e.g., surgery, radiology, etc.). For example, in the Medical Ground Rules document, you’ll find the conversion factor table on page 12.
  • Once you have the conversion factor you need, find the CPT code for the specific type of service you want to look up.
  • For each CPT code, there is a Relative Value Unit (RVU) listed.
  • Multiply the RVU by the conversion factor to calculate the fee for that service.

The Takeaway.

The New York Workers’ Compensation Medical fee Schedules now specifically address how providers who render treatment to New York residents out-of-state should be reimbursed. This means that a qualified out-of-state medical provider should be reimbursed (paid) at the rate applicable in the region where the claimant resides (in New York). The Board has continuing jurisdiction to resolve disputes between medical providers and insurers for out-of-state medical care and now has set forth a bright-line rule for how those providers will be reimbursed.

Video: Top Tips for Medical Provider Claims in New Jersey

Attorneys Joe Jones and Gregory Lois present practical methods for closing New Jersey Medical Provider Claims. The attorneys discuss recent case law developments, tactics for negotiating closures, and trial strategy. The video and handout materials (below) are from the live presentation provided to the Firm’s clients on May 6, 2019.

Complete the form below for a copy of the in-depth handout materials:

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New Jersey Medical Provider Claims Have a Six-Year Statute of Limitations

Attorney Greg LoisOn January 17, 2019 the New Jersey Appellate Division ruled that medical providers filing a “Medical Provider Application for Payment or Reimbursement of Medical Payment” seeking additional money from workers’ compensation insurance carriers have six years to file their claims. This is longer than the two year Statute of Limitations which applies to the underlying workers’ compensation claim. This decision will increase the number of Medical Provider Claims filed in New Jersey.

Reasoning of the Appellate Court.

In The Plastic Surgery Center, PA. v. Malouf Chevrolet-Cadillac, Inc, the New Jersey Appellate Division decided that a medical provider has to file a claim in the Division of Workers’ Compensation within six years of the service provided. The case has been reported.

The Court noted that suits on contracts in New Jersey have a six-year statute of limitations under N.J.S.A. 2A:14-1. When the New Jersey Legislature amended the New Jersey statute in 2012 granting exclusive jurisdiction over disputed medical charges to the Division of Workers’ Compensation, the Legislature never addressed which statute of limitations would apply. The Court found that the rationale for a two year statute of limitations does not fit N.J.S.A. 34:15-51, which is the statute of limitations provision in New Jersey. The Court ruled that

“[w]e are most persuaded that the Legislature intended to leave unaltered the time within which medical-provider claims must be commenced because the Act’s two-year-bar simply doesn’t fit.”

The Court found that a two-year rule could mean that the statute would run on the rights of the medical provider to file before the medical service is even provided because the medical provider might not render its service until after two years from the date of accident.

Impact of this Decision.

According to the statistics provided by the Division of Workers’ Compensation, one of every five claim petitions in New Jersey is a Medical Provider Claim. This decision will likely embolden medical providers, working outside of New Jersey but closely watching the medical provider claim action in this State because they are covetous of the “usual and customary” (extremely high) payment scheme, to accelerate the trend of opening satellite offices in New Jersey and with he plan of continuing to persuade their patients to “cross a river” and seek ambulatory surgery, procedures, and treatment in New Jersey at a much higher cost to the carrier.

This decision does not address the payment to be reimbursed where the claimant’s only contact with the state of New Jersey is the place of treatment rendered. Right now there are conflicting decision issued by trial-level judges (Judge of Compensation) in the many workers’ compensation courts (vicinages).